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Pan's Piper Below are the 10 most recent journal entries recorded in the "pans_piper" journal:

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June 10th, 2006
09:31 pm

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Classical citations
I will be updating this far too neglected journal with classical citations about Pan.

It is said that the festival of the Lupercalia, which is still observed, was even in those days celebrated on the Palatine hill. This hill was originally called Pallantium from a city of the same name in Arcadia; the name was afterwards changed to Palatium. Evander, an Arcadian, had held that territory many ages before, and had introduced an annual festival from Arcadia in which young men ran about naked for sport and wantonness, in honour of the Lycaean Pan, whom the Romans afterwards called Inuus. The existence of this festival was widely recognised...

(Livy, History of Rome, 1.5)

I had not connected the Lupercalia to Pan before.

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October 26th, 2005
08:15 pm

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Icons
I have found many interesting icons at the place of pixelbee

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September 17th, 2005
08:57 pm

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The Blessing of Pan
The Blessing of Pan by Lord Dunsany.

I found this an easy book to read - and no one would mistake it for a book of anything other than its time. I do not have the book to hand to check but I believe Pan is never directly named in the book but there can be no mistaking what is happening to the sleepy little English village. It will tell you little you do not know about Pan, but the story may intrigue you.

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July 6th, 2005
09:26 am

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Image
PAN by Don Blanding - part way down the page.

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July 2nd, 2005
04:43 pm

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Images...
Pan by Franz von Stuck

Another by same

Collection of images

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04:40 pm

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(Prayers and invocations, from Here

TO PAN OF THE FOUNTAIN
AUTHOR UNKNOWN

We supplicate Pan, the goer on the cliffs, twy-horned leader of the Nymphs, who abides in this house of rock, to be gracious to us, whosoever come to this spring of ever-flowing drink to rid us of our thirst.

XXXVI
TO PAN AND THE NYMPHS
ANYTE

To Pan the bristly-haired, and the Nymphs of the farm-yard, Theodotus the shepherd laid this gift under the crag, because they stayed him when very weary under the parching summer, stretching out to him honey-sweet water in their hands.

XXXVII
TO THE SHEPHERD-GOD
THEOCRITUS

White-skinned Daphnis, the player of pastoral hymns on his fair pipe, offers these to Pan, the pierced reeds, the stick for throwing at hares, a sharp javelin and a fawn-skin, and the scrip wherein once he carried apples.

XXXVIII TO PAN, BY A HUNTER, A FOWLER, AND A FISHER
ARCHIAS

To thee, Pan of the cliff, three brethren dedicate these various gifts of their threefold ensnaring; Damis toils for wild beasts, and Pigres springes for birds, and Cleitor nets that swim in the sea; whereof do thou yet again make the one fortunate in the air, and the one in the sea and the one among the oakwoods.

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03:41 pm

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Let there be music....
Although, perhaps, not complimentary to Pan, it is Bach... The contest between Phoebus and Pan

To listen, Try this page

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July 1st, 2005
01:03 pm

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More images
Signerlli, The School of Pan (or Court of Pan)

Cosimo, The death of Procris (I have no idea what Pan was supposed to be doing in this painting - that I know of, there's no mention of him being there, in the myths?)

Carracci, Pan and Diana

Beardsley Entombement (I've no idea what this is actually called)

More Beardsley Pan

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June 29th, 2005
06:25 pm

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Rant
I've just seen yet another site that lists Pan among the "lesser gods".

Why?

(Mainly because the site builder is going off other sites, I suspect).

GO BACK TO THE TEXTS.

All too often, what one reads is the Romantic idea/l of Pan, rather than what the Greeks actually thought and knew.

This is a God who was accorded honours equal to Zeus.

He just wasn't vain enough to worry about it. :)

So why do I?

Because misrepresentation is misrepresentation and history deserves to be done *well*.

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08:50 am

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Bibliography
If you have access to JSTOR or other academic archive, these will be easy for you to find. If you don't have such access, it might be worth looking around the very dusty shelves of old libraries (note the dates on some of them). (The stable links will take you to a JSTOR access page, rather than directly to the article. I've left them in for those who might have such access). I've not read most of these (yet), but a list for your perusal:


1.
Title: The Cult of Pan in Ancient Greece (Review)
Author(s): Gregory D. Alles
Author(s) of Work: Philippe Borgeaud; Kathleen Atlass; James Redfield
Source: The Journal of Religion, Vol. 71, No. 2. (Apr., 1991), pp.
302-303.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-4189%28199104%2971%3A2%3C302%3ATCOPIA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-F


2.
Title: The Divine Name "Pan"
Author(s): Edwin L. Brown
Source: Transactions of the American Philological Association
(1974-), Vol. 107. (1977), pp. 57-61.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0360-5949%281977%29107%3C57%3ATDN%22%3E2.0.CO%3B2-X


3.
Title: The Survival of Pan
Author(s): W. R. Irwin
Source: PMLA, Vol. 76, No. 3. (Jun., 1961), pp. 159-167.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0030-8129%28196106%2976%3A3%3C159%3ATSOP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Y


4.
Title: Recherches sur le dieu Pan (Review)
Author(s): R. C. T. Parker
Author(s) of Work: Philippe Borgeaud
Source: The Classical Review, New Ser., Vol. 31, No. 1. (1981),
pp. 130-131.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0009-840X%281981%292%3A31%3A1%3C130%3ARSLDP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-U


5.
Title: PAN, PANEION, PANIKON
Author(s): E. Harrison
Source: The Classical Review, Vol. 40, No. 1. (Feb. - Mar., 1926),
pp. 6-8.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0009-840X%28192602%2F03%291%3A40%3A1%3C6%3APPP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-G


6.
Title: The Cult of Pan in Ancient Greece (Review)
Author(s): Patricia Merivale
Author(s) of Work: Philippe Borgeaud; Kathleen Atlass; James Redfield
Source: The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 104, No. 413.
(Summer, 1991), pp. 380-382.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0021-8715%28199122%29104%3A413%3C380%3ATCOPIA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-A


7.
Title: The Death of the Great Pan: The Problem of
Interpretation
Author(s): Philippe Borgeaud
Source: History of Religions, Vol. 22, No. 3. (Feb., 1983), pp.
254-283.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0018-2710%28198302%2922%3A3%3C254%3ATDOTGP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-5


8.
Title: Modern Greek Folklore: The Smerdaki
Author(s): Pan. S. Codellas
Source: The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 58, No. 229. (Jul.
- Sep., 1945), pp. 236-244.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0021-8715%28194507%2F09%2958%3A229%3C236%3AMGFTS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-I


9.
Title: Pan and Puer Aeternus: Aestheticism and the Spirit of the
Age
Author(s): Jean Perrot
Source: Poetics Today, Vol. 13, No. 1, Children's Literature.
(Spring, 1992), pp. 155-167.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0333-5372%28199221%2913%3A1%3C155%3APAPAAA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-0


10.
Title: The Waterfowl Goddess Penelope and Her Son Pan
Author(s): A. Shewan
Source: The Classical Review, Vol. 29, No. 2. (Mar., 1915), pp.
37-40.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0009-840X%28191503%291%3A29%3A2%3C37%3ATWGPAH%3E2.0.CO%3B2-V


11.
Title: Apollo, Pan, and Zeus, Avengers of Vultures: Agamemnon,
55-59
Author(s): Kevin Clinton
Source: The American Journal of Philology, Vol. 94, No. 3.
(Autumn, 1973), pp. 282-288.
Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-9475%28197323%2994%3A3%3C282%3AAPAZAO%3E2.0.CO%3B2-B

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